Blog

Transitioning to long-term care – Selecting a care facility

Moving into a long-term care facility can feel like a rollercoaster ride for both the caregiver and the person being cared for.  It is full of twists and turns, ups and downs and they usually happen very quickly.  We know the drop is coming but the anticipation is often the worst! Even when the ride Read more…

5 Tips to Minimize Family Conflict While Caring For An Aging Loved One

The common pitfalls of family dynamics and conflicts end to revolve around the issue of caring for an aging loved on.  How can we “share the care” without creating unnecessary conflict?  It all comes down to family members being able to make key decisions together; reaching consensus on dividing the caregiving tasks and how well Read more…

Giving the Gift of Time with our Elders

I was about six years old when I remember visiting a nursing home. That’s what my parents called Long Term Care in the 70s. Our family drove on Christmas day to visit with our elderly neighbours, the Coppers, who had move into a nursing home in North Toronto the year before. I remember consciously trying Read more…

NOT in My Family – Working with Caregivers to Reduce Elder Abuse

Over one million people in BC care for an adult relative, friend or neighbour in BC because of disease, disability or frailty due to aging. Most caregiving relationships are based on good intentions and are very rewarding. However, it can also be exhausting, and emotionally and physically demanding. There are key risk factors that may Read more…

Transitioning a loved one to long-term care

  Making the decision to move a spouse or aging parent into long term care is one of the most difficult decisions families have to make. Before we get into the nitty-gritty, it’s actually helpful to clarify what is meant by “long term care”. Trust me, there are so many different ways to describe this Read more…

Caregivers in distress: More respite needed in BC

I’ve had the honour of hearing Isobel Mackenzie, our Seniors Advocate for the Province of British Columbia speak on seniors’ issues. Isobel weaves the personal stories she hears from seniors and families to bring life to the gaps in subsidized supports and programs needed to not only keep seniors living as independent as possible but Read more…

What does caregiver respite look like?

This quote by Silver Donald Cameron captures the incredibly vital yet unrecognized role of family caregivers: “If Canada’s health-care system were a plant, family caregivers would be its roots—fragile, vital and invisible. The part we see—branches, leaves and flowers—is the apparatus of doctors, nurses, clinics, labs and hospitals. But the “visible” health-care system has always Read more…

What’s the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia?

A lot of caregivers ask me, “What’s the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease?” Dementia is an umbrella term that refers to the many different types of dementia.  Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common type of dementia, accounting for approximately 64% of all cases in Canada.  Other types of dementia include vascular dementia, Pick’s Disease, Read more…

Understanding loss – and how seniors cope with loss

I consider it a daily gift to work with people in later life; to hear about their unique footprint on earth, to celebrate their personal victories, to share in their losses and to find a way forward that brings continued meaning, purpose and independence. In particular, the experience of loss as we age can cause Read more…

It’s OK to be a reluctant caregiver

I was speaking to my friend, Robert, who I would describe as a “reluctant caregiver” and I was struck by the internal struggle he faces with his aging parents. It is clear there is a long history of conflict and hurt between him and his father. There isn’t much affection between them and his visits Read more…

Helpful Videos

Watch for the Signs

Caregiver Consultations: How We Help Frail Elderly Parents

Long Distance Caregiving

“You are amazing! What I tried to do in 2 months, you did in 1 week. You’ve helped us navigate the system, made sense of Mom’s disease, and gave back her independence and control. Thank you for making such a difference in Mom’s life and giving us, her family, complete peace of mind.”

– Mike G., Nanaimo, BC

READ MORE TESTIMONIALS